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Courses in the Student's Major (English-Language Programme)

NUPACE ACADEMIC PROGRAM

ADDITIONAL COURSES TAUGHT IN ENGLISH

As of autumn 2014, Nagoya University has opened six undergraduate and seven graduate degree programmes taught entirely in English, known as the "Nagoya University Global 30 International Programmes", or simply "G30 Programmes". Courses comprising the G30 programmes are, in principle, open to exchange students, and a large number of NUPACE students are taking advantage of the opportunity to register for them.

Website for G30 programmes: http://admissions.g30.nagoya-u.ac.jp/en/Program/

NB. Irrespective of whether they wish to register for G30 courses, applicants to the NUPACE student exchange programme should apply directly to the NUPACE Office, following procedures laid down in this prospectus and on the programme website, viewable at http://www.ecis.nagoya-u.ac.jp/en/nupace/. G30 programme admission requirements and procedures do NOT apply to exchange students.

Undergraduate Programmes

  • Fundamental and Applied Physics
           Syllabi of Specialized Courses
    • Japan-in-Asia Cutural Studies
    Graduate Programmes
    • Biological and Bioagricultural Sciences
    • Chemistry
    • Japan-in-Asia Cultural Studies
    • Comparative Studies of Language and Culture
    • Economics and Business Administration
    • Medical Science
    • Physics and Mathematics


    NUPACE ACADEMIC PROGRAM

    International Education and Exchange Center

    1. Career and Life Development <Graduate> (autumn and spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: Go YOSHIDA)
    Deciding on one's career is probably one of the most important decisions made in our lives. Yet, it is but one component of a person's life. The purpose of this class is to explore fundamental issues regarding career and life for students to develop a framework of thinking that would help them align their passion and strengths with their career and life goals. The ultimate goal of this class is to transform students' thinking so that their actions - aligned with purpose - are of value to others and that they are useful to their organizations and communities. 

    2. Contemporary Japanese Society (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: NOMIZU Tsutomu)
    This course introduces students to the main features of contemporary Japanese society, setting these in a comparative context. Areas of focus include aspects of Japanese law, the workplace, economy, education, modernisation, and environmental issues. The course shall take the form of lectures and discussion classes given by experts in their fields, and shall include field trips to sites of interest.

    3. Disney as Cultural Teacher  (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: David POMATTI)
    This is a media-literacy course on "reading Disney": How to understand the social and cultural messages in Disney features, from the earliest animations to full-length "live action" movies, and also the various Disneyland theme parks. From the beginning, Walt Disney sought to present "American" values and viewpoints through his productions. The nature of this Americanism has changed over the years as American society has changed, and this is reflected in the images, but core patterns have remained. We will look at 1) the social and psychological meaning of Mickey Mouse and other characters, 2) how "Disneyfication" works (changing sources to fit the Disney formula), 3) whether Disney is good for children, 4) evolving stereotypes in Disney, 5) the Disney Worldview, 6) Disney's idea of nature and of history, 7) Disney and feminism, 8) how Disney has adapted to different countries

    There will be ample video illustrations, including the viewing and analysis of several full Disney features. All printed materials will be provided by the teacher, but the short text must be bought. Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation in discussions, short worksheets related to the viewing, and a final report demonstrating the student's own media literacy.


    4.Immigration in Japan: Law, society, and politics (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: Claudia ISHIKAWA)
    This course aims to analyse the legal and social status of foreigners In Japan, focusing in particular on the framework of nationality and immigration laws, the rights and protections afforded to aliens under domestic laws, prospective policy developments vis-à-vis their admission, and the general perception of foreigners. The principal setting will be Japan, although students are invited to draw comparisons with the situation in their home countries, and to examine the protection afforded to foreigners under international law. The course will take the form of a seminar, whereby students are expected to take it in turn to both give presentations and chair the class.


    5. Independent Thinking and Decision Making 
    (spring and spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: Go YOSHIDA)
    Whether it be deciding on which movie to rent, how to work things out with your obnoxious team member, or what career to pursue after graduation, our lives today are a result of the choices or decisions we made in the past. The decisions we make can be based on a number of factors, among them are the often used risk-reward analysis and choices based on values and priorities. In this class, we will examine how we naturally think and make decisions, through both theoretical and practical approaches, to enable better life decisions for both immediate and long term results.


    6. Introduction to Japanese Politics  (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: Robert ASPINALL)
    This course introduces students to the main issues in contemporary Japanese politics. Subjects to be discussed include the election system, the changing political party system, the role of the prime minister, the role of bureaucrats, and issues related to local politics. The course is flexible, allowing time for students to explore their own interests and keep up with contemporary events and developments. Students will be expected to prepare papers and give presentations on relevant topics.


    7. Teaching Practice in the Japanese Community
    (autumn/spring; 2 credits; course co-ordinator: Claudia ISHIKAWA)
    This guided independent study involves teaching English to, and developing a rapport/playing with approximately twenty elementary school-aged children (ages six to twelve) at Nagoya University's childcare centre, "Poppins-After-School". Students will be required to devise an English-language curriculum (which may include the teaching of basic theme-oriented vocabulary using visual aids; playing educational games and simple sports, etc.), and then, in accordance with the curriculum, teach the pupils rudimentary-level English. Those students, who at the end of the semester submit a report describing their teaching practice experience, will receive two credits.


    School of Agricultural Sciences

    Introduction to Bioagricultural Sciences(autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: MURASE Jun)
    We are beset by an array of global concerns such as the depletion of food and energy resources, poverty and health problems, and the destruction of the natural- and living-environment. This course, by taking as its base recent developments in the field of life sciences, aims to propose possible solutions to the above, through the analysis of biological production, symbiosis, and frontier technology in the field of bioscience. Topics to be covered include: Enzyme engineering, molecular insect sciences, genetically modified crops, international co-operation, basic reproductive endocrinology, sustainable coffee and cassava cropping, current trends in crop production in Japan, forest resources in Japan, and the ecology of rice-fields.

     

    School of Economics

    1. Advanced Income Theory I, II   (spring and autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: ARAYAMA Yuko)
    A simple economy consists of households, firms and government. Market is a manmade device to connect them each other. Income theory has been serving as a tool to analyse the determination of national income and the reasons for its fluctuation. These courses intend not only to promote an understanding of the microeconomic foundation of macroeconomics, but also to enhance a sense of practical applications of income theory toward the real world.


    2. Development
    Economics  (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: XUE Jinjun)
    This course is a subject study of the Chinese economy. The purpose of this lecture is to foster 1) the ability to analyse the Chinese economy through studying theories of economic development and 2) a better understanding of the current issues in China's economic development.


    3.  Economic Theory and Applications I
      (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: ARAYAMA Yuko)
    This lecture reviews the nature of the Neo-classical system under perfect competition, 1) partial equilibrium analysis and 2) general equilibrium analysis, without an explicitly defined household.


    4.  Economic Theory and Applications II
      (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: ARAYAMA Yuko)
    This lecture deals with the general theory of market equilibrium with household production. This general equilibrium is intrinsically dynamic in its nature due to a household production formulated by Professor Becker.


    5. Financial Accounting A 
    (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: NOGUCHI Akihiro)
    This course introduces students to the theory and application of accounting principles generally accepted in the United States.


    6. International Accounting A
    (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: NOGUCHI Akihiro)
    The lecture is intended to provide an opportunity for students to learn and understand international aspects of accounting.


    7. Introduction to Global Management
    (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: SANO Yoshio)
    Providing an overview of the current global economy and global management of various issues, such as corporate management, human resources management, and international accounting etc. is the first objective of this workshop. By inviting guest speakers from several global companies such as Nomura Holdings, Inc., DENSO Corporation, Mitsui & Co., Ltd, Daido Steel Co., Ltd, Brother Industry Ltd., we will review the hands-on activities of these companies in the global economy.

    Second, by reviewing the history of development of the Japanese economy and globalization of certain corporations, we will try to understand the essential conditions for economic development and globalisation, and try to catch the key clues to successful economic development and globalisation of developing countries..


    8. Law and Economics Workshop 
     (spring~autumn; 1 credit per semester; 1 class per fortnight; course co-ordinators: ARAYAMA Yuko & MATSUURA Yoshiharu)

    This workshop is jointly-organised by the Schools of Economics and Law to promote a theoretical and practical understanding of legal regulations imposed on economic activities. A minimum of 15 sessions will be held during the year according to the class calendar. The workshop will discuss the following topics in Law and Economics to help promote an understanding of human behaviour, social contracts and legal structure in our modern society. The workshop will also invite several prominent scholars and practitioners in the field of law and economics to present their ideas. Topics to be covered include, 1) market activities and law, 2) property rights and property law, 3) contract law, and 4) tort liability and tort law.


    School of Education

    Education in Japan (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: Robert ASPINALL)
    This course seeks to examine education in Japan from both a historical and comparative aspect. The main features of the Japanese education system from kindergarten up to higher education are introduced, and both their evolution and current discourse concerning changes and reforms are discussed. Students are encouraged to compare features of the Japanese education system with education systems in their own countries. Students will be required to write an individual report and take part in a group research project and presentation.


    School of Engineering

    1. Academic, Scientific, and Technical English (autumn, 1 credit; 1 class per fortnight; course co-ordinator: Laurence M. DRYDEN)
    This series of special lectures, conducted entirely in English, provides guided practice in written and spoken English in academic, scientific, and technical contexts. Lectures include illustrated presentations and activities for students to apply their learning. The series is open to native speakers and non-native speakers of English.


    2. Advanced Lecture on the System Safety of Machinery 
    (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: YAMADA Yoji)
    Securing the safety of mechanical systems can be achieved by overall risk management processes, in which designing stages of risk management and risk reduction measures based upon the assessment results, plays an important role. The course provides probabilistic quantification methodology for evaluating the safety integrity level of targeted mechanical systems and advancing the level in reference to their risk assessment processes.


    2. Civil Engineering and Policies for Developing Countries I  
    (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: HAYASHI Kiichiro)
    The objectives of this course are to acquire a fundamental knowledge of planning, design, construction and maintenance of infrastructure in Japan, as well as in developing countries, and to survey various issues in civil engineering, including environmental problems and the recent development of regional disaster mitigation activities. The course will cover the following topics related to developing countries: Infrastructure development and development aid, evaluation of ODA projects, ground improvement technologies and applications, tsunami and storm surge disaster mitigation, worldwide challenge of water-related disasters and ICHARM's activities, and bridge deterioration and maintenance.


    3. Introduction to Applied Physics, Materials & Energy Engineering
    (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator:YAMADA Tomoaki)
    This course introduces the fundamentals of applied physics, materials science, and quantum energy. Magnetism, superconductivity, and recent developments pertaining to quantum computers are discussed. Topics to be analysed include 1) fundamentals and applications of ceramics and metals (steel structures, car bodies, etc.), 2) the design of physical properties, 3) refining and processing of materials, and 4) nuclear fusion and quantum energy utilisation.


    4. Introduction to Chemical & Biological Industries
    (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: SUZUKI Atsuo)
    This course introduces the current state and future prospects of R&D and production activities in Japan's chemical and biological industries. The industries' relationship with human society, involvement in environmental and energy issues, and role in global society will also be discussed.


    5. Introduction to Civil Engineering & Architecture
    (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator:  TANIKAWA Hiroki)
    This course examines the role of civil engineering and architecture in improving the social environment. In the first half of the semester, students will be introduced to the fundamental theories of civil engineering and building techniques that pertain to social infrastructure development projects. The second half of the semester will entail a multi-faceted and comprehensive study of construction systems. Site visits will be included in the course. Evaluation is by means of reports.


    6. Introduction to Production Engineering
    (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: JU Yang)
    This course provides a fundamental knowledge of production engineering and its current status in Japan's industries. The lecturers have extensive experience of working in Japan's leading companies in the automobile, automobile parts, and aerospace industries. Lectures cover elementary aspects of production engineering, including management, planning, schedules, system, evaluation, IT utilisation, quality enhancement, design, the manufacturing process, market research, etc. Regular attendance and several assignments are required. Final course evaluation is based on attendance records and assignment marks.


    7. Motor Control and Information Processing in the Biological System 
    (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: OBINATA Goro)

    The purpose of this lecture is to understand the mechanism for generating human movements. We learn the functions of central nervous and sensory systems, which are important for the mechanism of muscle control through the associated neural system. We focus on the control of ion channels in verve cells and the energy cycle in living organisms, which are deeply related to motor control. In addition, we learn that sophisticated human movements are achieved by integrating the functions of the central nervous system and many other organs. Artificial machines which have been designed by imitating the mechanisms of motor and sensory systems in living organism also comprise key points of this lecture.


    8. Overview of Advanced Electrical, Electronic & Information Engineering
    (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: KATO Jien)
    In the lectures, current topics in advanced electrical, electronic and information engineering will be reviewed and explained. Plant visits introduce students to practices of advanced technology. The course is arranged so as to cover the fields of electric power systems, information devices and information engineering.


    9. Science and Technology in Japan
    (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: Emanuel LELEITO)
    This course introduces the history, the current state and future prospects of R&D (research and development) in various sectors related to the field of engineering in Japan. This class consists of "omnibus-style" lectures, all provided in English.


    10. Space Electromagnetic Environment<Graduate>
    (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: SHIOKAWA Kazuo)
    This class deals with basic plasma physics, MHD theory, and structure and dynamics of the Solar-Terrestrial environment.


    Graduate School of Environmental Studies (GSES)



    1. Climate Change Policies (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: SUGIYAMA Noriko)
    The objective of the course is to provide students with basic facts and knowledge on policy measures pertaining to climate change. Distinguished external lecturers will give lectures, in addition to lectures by the course coordinator. The basic facts that the students should know are contents of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol. Furthermore, other related matters such as climate change and cities, and energy policy will be explained.

    2. Ecosystem Management (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: NATUHARA Yosihiro)
    The objective of this class is to provide students with fundamental concepts of ecology for ecosystem management, which integrates scientific knowledge toward a goal of protecting ecosystem integrity without damaging its resilience. This class focuses on the ecological concepts and methods to realise societies in harmony with nature. Students are expected to learn methodology of ecosystem management for sustainable use of ecosystem services by integrating multiple disciplines.


    3. English Communication in Environmental Issues (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: Victor MUHANDIKI)
    English communication ability is a fundamental requirement for engineers and scientists working in the field of environmental problems, since environmental problems are not unique to any one country. In this course students will be assigned specific subjects concerning environmental problems, and then be required to present and discuss the studied subjects in class in English.


    4. Environmental Industry Systems (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: IMAI Seiju)
    )
    The course consists of, 1) lectures by environmental industries located in the Chubu area; 2) presentations and/or discussions amongst students, 3) discussions between students and industry representatives. The industries are prominent companies mainly in the field of manufacturing.


    5. Environmental Systems Analysis and Planning (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: TANIKAWA Hiroki)
    This course aims to acquaint students with 1) "environmental systems", i.e., the interaction of human activities and nature, 2) the scientific mechanisms of global environmental problems, such as climatic change, 3) the basic principles and methods of analysing environmental systems, e.g., environmental economics, mathematical models, life-cycle assessment, etc., and 4) the principles and methods of environmental management on local, national and global scales.


    6. Field Seminar on Environmental Studies
    (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: YAMAGUCHI Yasushi)
    Observations and discussions will be conducted during field seminars on a variety of topics pertaining to environmental studies, such as the interaction between human activities and environments. Areas of interest to be visited are, 1) public institutions and private enterprises in and around Nagoya to learn about environmental measures, 2) the western part of the Nōbi Plain including the Fujimae mud flat, Nagaragawa River mouth dam and delta areas, and 3) the central part of Nagoya to discuss the relationship between natural environments and infrastructures, and to actually measure aerosol particles to understand the atmospheric environment.

    NB. Participants are required to have a good Japanese comprehension level.


    7. Low Carbon Cities Studies
    (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: TANIKAWA Hiroki)
    In this course students become acquainted with policies, plans and technological and institutional measures implemented to realise low carbon cities, with a view to integrating climatic change mitigation into urban development.


    8. Planning and Design Studio for Historical Environment <Graduate> (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: NISHIZAWA Yasuhiko)
    This design studio aims to teach design theory, methods of preservation of historical heritages, and urban planning in historical districts. In practice, this year students are requested to draw up proposals for the preservation and renewal of an old wooden building "Nakamura Koen (Park) Kinenkan" built in 1910 in Nakamura Park in western Nagoya. Students may propose to convert this building into a community centre, providing new facilities for neighbours, visitors, and Nagoya citizens.

    NB. This is an advanced studio workshop for graduated students with experience of architectural studio or urban design studio.

    9. Politics and Diplomacy in the International Environment <Graduate> (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: IGUCHI Haruo)
    This course will explore historical and theoretical aspects of international politics in the twentieth century with emphasis on international relations since the end of the Second World War. Topics covered in this course include, basic aspects of international politics, international politics from the late nineteenth century to the present, and globalisation and interdependence.


    10. Studio Workshop of Architecture Design <Graduate>  (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: KATAGI Atsushi)
    Studio workshop of an architectural project under a given site and program, that aims to develop the student's skills in analysis, design and presentation. Projects may include the design of a facility related to a certain urban infrastructure or a proposal to a design competition that is open to architectural students.


    11. Sustainability and Environmental Studies (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: Victor MUHANDIKI)
    The objective of the course is to provide students with several definitions, views, interpretations, and analyses of the notion of sustainability. Although sustainability covers broad areas, the course tries to clarify a large range of topics from three viewpoints, namely 1) society and/or social sciences, 2) observation and data by natural sciences, and 3) an urban and spatial perspective.


    12. Water and Waste Engineering (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: Victor MUHANDIKI)
    Water pollution and solid waste are some of the major environmental problems facing our society today. In this class we will learn about various technologies and measures applied in drinking water supply, control of pollution of water bodies, and solid waste management.


    13. Water and Waste Management Policies (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: Victor MUHANDIKI)
    Water pollution and solid waste are some of the major environmental problems facing our society today. For effective management of water and waste, it is essential to have relevant rules, laws and policies, and the institutions to administer them. This course will introduce the challenges of managing the water environment and waste focusing on legal, policy and institutional frameworks.

    Graduate School of Information Science (GSIS)

    Advanced Lectures on Quantum Information (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: Francesco BUSCEMI))
    The course will provide an introduction to quantum information theory, suitable for an audience with no specific background. The following topics will be covered: Mathematical description of quantum systems; composite systems, purification, and quantum entanglement; evolution of open quantum systems; quantum channels; quantum measurement processes; simple quantum communication scenarios (noiseless channels, super-dense coding, quantum teleportation); noisy communication channels; quantum entropies; classical and quantum information transmission; basic ideas in classical and quantum coding techniques; and introduction to quantum cryptography.

    Graduate School of International Development (GSID)

    1. Educational Development and Cooperation (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: YONEZAWA Akiyoshi)
    This course is intended to generate a comprehensive understanding of theories and practices in educational development and co-operation. The course is divided into two parts: Part one is aimed at fostering the acquisition of basic knowledge and skills necessary when approaching issues in educational development and cooperation. The class covers major methodologies in social sciences, as research in educational development and cooperation inevitably requires an interdisciplinary approach. Part two provides an overview of practices in international cooperation in education. Starting with an introduction to basic governance structures and organisations of international co-operation, the class covers major issues in the practices of educational development and co-operation at various levels in education.


    2. Educational Development Planning and Evaluation (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: YONEZAWA Akiyoshi)
    This course aims to consider the role of higher education within the framework of educational development planning and evaluation. Higher education plays an essential role in the contemporary knowledge-based society, and has its own context distinguished from primary and secondary education.  At the same time, education planning and evaluation is inevitably linked to issues of access to higher education, brain drain and brain gain typically occurring at the higher education level.


    3. Human Security and Law
    (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: YAMAGATA Hideo)
    The objective of this course is to understand security issues in the framework of the Charter of the United Nations. First, the collective security system is dealt with in comparison with the old balance of powers policy. Second, the changing system of the UN collective security after 1990 will be addressed. Last, lectures will be given on the newly-emerged concept of human security. The standpoint from which this course is offered is international law.


    4. International Co-operation Law (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: YAMAGATA Hideo)
    This is an introductory course for the study of international law, with the aim of imparting a basic knowledge of what international law is, and how it functions. Due to time constraints, it does not cover the entire field of international law; however, through the analysis of the ICJ judgement in the Nicaragua case, it will impart a basic idea. Stress will be put on the structural change of international law between its traditional and contemporary forms.


    5. Introduction to International Development (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: NISHIKAWA Yukiko/OTSUBO Shigeru)
    This course introduces students to the inter-disciplinary nature of international development. It presents aspects of international development from various disciplines such as 1) economic development a management, 2) rural and regional development, 3) governance and law, 4) peace-building, 5) social development and culture, and 6) education and human resource development. Lectures are given by instructors from various academic and professional backgrounds. A detailed schedule is announced on the GSID's homepage: http://www.gsid.nagoya-u.ac.jp/index-en.html.


    6. Japan's Development Experience (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinators: SHIMADA Yuzuru/SHINKAI Naoko)
    This course examines the development and modernisation process of Japan from various perspectives, including both positive and negative. Lecturers from different disciplines deal with issues such as the economy, law, governments, rural areas, social security systems, education, peace-building, etc. Participants will understand the crucial issues pertaining to Japan's development experience, and consider the adaptability of this experience to other countries.


    7. Law and Development Studies (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: SHIMADA Yuzuru)
    The aim of "Law and Development Studies (LDS)" is to analyse the role of legal systems and institutions in socio-economic development, or the relationship between development and legal systems in developing countries. This course focuses on relevant theories in LDS and case studies.


    8. Lecture on International Development 1: International migration theory (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: ASAKAWA Akihiro)
    In this class, various aspects of the current phenomenon on international migration will be considered. Topics covered include immigration control, social integration, remittances, impact for accepting and sending countries, refugee recognition, etc. To understand current immigration issues, Australian radio news on immigration related topics will be introduced in every class.



    Graduate School of Languages and Cultures

    1. Topics in the Geography of Culture I: Ameriglish as a toll for understanding American culture (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: Simon POTTER)
    The main objective of this course is to get insights into how important language is in culture, especially as a device which establishes values and mentalities. Students will be expected to consult the course book - a lexicon which has been specially prepared to be used in Japanese higher education - as well as other sources to write a sequence of essays that will be linked to themes in contemporary America.

    2. Topics in the Geography of Culture II: A critical look into multiculturalism in the U.S. (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: Simon POTTER)
    The main objectives of this course are to investigate some social, political, and economic issues in contemporary America, to come to a reasonable understanding of the interplay of cultural ideals and realities, and to get some experience in writing brief, concise, and informed essays within a reasonably short amount of time.

    School of Law

    1. Comparative Studies in Constitutional Law: Outline of the Modern Constitution (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: OHKOCHI Minori)
    This course is an introduction to the theory of modern constitution followed by a comparative analysis of issues in Japan and selected Asian countries. The course covers, 1) Historical development of the modern Constitution, 2) Basic principles of the modern governmental system and human rights, 3) Constitutional issues and the theory of Constitutional law in Japan, 4) Constitutional issues and the theory of Constitutional law in selected Asian countries, and 5) Constitutional theory for better-protected human rights and more democratic politics.


    2. Comparative Studies in Criminal Law: Development of national criminal law under the influence of foreign and international law 
    (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: TAKAYAMA Kanako)
    The purpose of this course is to analyse the development of national criminal law under the influence of foreign and international law. There will be particular focus on comparisons between different judicial groupings such as common law countries, countries with the European continental legal tradition, Islamic countries, etc. Participants are required to report on their country's experience and their views on desirable legislation in the future. Legal systems in general as well as specific topics in criminal law and criminal procedure will be discussed.

    3. Comparative Studies in Jurisprudence I: The Law and Its Personnel (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: MORIGIWA Yasutomo)
    What is the most difficult aspect of setting up a legal system? Legislation, funding, or provision of facilities? Each of these stages does have its problems, but the training of personnel probably presents the greatest hurdle. Technical, legal and moral competence is required for those who man and run the legal system. How can legal education provide such qualities to its trainees? Discussion and interviews are conducted on this question following intensive reading of literature on the subject. The course will be taught in English. International and Japanese students are welcome, and will be asked to address scenarios based on their practical knowledge.


    4. Comparative Studies in Jurisprudence II: Uses of the Public Sphere - Good Practice versus Corruption
    (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: MORIGIWA Yasutomo)
    This class will provide a better understanding of the liberal democratic state by observing phenomena and theories of corruption in the context of the practicalities of (mainly) developing nations. Students will wrestle with such fundamental questions on law and the state as violence, power, justice, the judiciary, public and private, and citizenship.


    5. International Politics
    (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: Richard WESTRA)
    This course offers a comprehensive introduction to the study of International Relations (IR). The course will commence with a review of the debate over the very definition of the field of IR as an area of study in Political Science. It then proceeds to cover such topics as IR theory, international political economy, international diplomacy and the making of state foreign policy, Intergovernmental and Nongovernmental Organizations (IGO's and NGO's), and global human rights. Further, the course will examine the networks of interstate relations - the Westphalia system, the UN model and Cosmopolitan Democracy - that characterise modern world history. It will conclude with discussion of the implications of globalization for the future of international security, interstate relations, and the nation state itself.


    6. Introduction to Private International Law
    (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: KIM Eunsuk)
    This is an introductory course to private international law (conflict of laws). The field of law called private international law deals with private-law relationship and civil proceedings having international implications. These days this field of law attracts special attention from both academia and practitioners as international disputes in private sector are increasing year by year. But still, it is considered that the rules of private international law remain too-technical and too complicated to understand. This introductory course will help you develop an overall understanding of the current private international law issues. In this course, we will examine the current conflict-of-laws system from a comparative and historical perspective and deal with private international law issues in terms of applicable law (choice of law), jurisdiction, recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments.

    7. Professional Studies in International Economic Law  (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: MIURA Satoshi)
    This course is designed to help students understand the basics of both Japanese foreign policy and international relations theory. Each student is expected to make a presentation by applying theories to a topic of his/her interest. Topics to be covered include, 1) Japanese Diplomacy after the Second World War, 2) Japan-US Relationship and Japan's Security Policy, 3) East Asian Regionalism and Japan, 4) Japanese Foreign Policy in the Age of Globalisation, and 5) Characteristics of Japanese Diplomacy and Political Culture.


    8. Professional Studies in International Human Rights Law: Human rights and refugee law 
    (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: OBATA Kaoru)
    In this seminar, we will select some topics related to current problems International Human Rights Law or Refugee Law and read relevant textbooks and articles. In each class, a student will act as 'reporter' and make a presentation on the assigned subject matter. This will be followed by discussion amongst class members. Participants should have a basic knowledge of International Law, in general, and Human Rights Law.


    9. Professional Studies in International Law: Introduction to international law (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: YAMAGATA Hideo)
    This is an introductory course for the study of international law, with the aim of imparting a basic knowledge of what international law is, and how it functions. Due to time constraints, it does not cover the entire field of international law; however, through the analysis of the ICJ judgement in the Nicaragua case, it will impart a basic idea. Stress will be put on the structural change of international law between its traditional and contemporary forms.

    10. Seminar on Private International Law: Introduction to International Commercial Arbitration (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: YOKOMIZO Dai)
    International commercial arbitration is becoming more and more important in the field of cross-border disputed resolution. While most advanced nations already are already familiar with arbitration, there is a growing demand of expertise in this field in developing countries. The regulatory framework in the world is moving towards a "globalised" arbitration: there is widespread acceptance of international models as base for legislation (e.g., the UNCITRAL Model Law on International Commercial Arbitration) and the circulation of awards is made smoother by effective international instruments (e.g., the 1958 New York Convention of the recognition and enforcement of foreign arbitral awards), However, many countries are lagging back in term of effective appliance of those international tools: national resistances (both legislative, judicial and political) and the lack of arbitration theoretical and practical expertise among legislators, judges and professional operators is jeopardizing an effective and homogeneous success of arbitration all over the world. One tool to subvert this situation is trying to provide law students with a strong basis of notions in this field. This seminar focuses on both theoretical and practical issues in arbitration, covering a wide spectrum of subjects in order to provide a comprehensive picture of what international arbitration is.


    11. Special Lecture and Seminar: Workshop on international negotiation (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: Frank BENNETT)
    This course provides an opportunity to study and to practice negotiation skills in an international context. Sessions will involve lectures, practical sessions, and discussions based on both. Topics to be covered may include, 1) The purpose of negotiation and the value of "negotiation skills", 2) The result of negotiation: Agreements and their forms, 3) Zero-sum versus win-win bargains, 4) Negotiation psychology and cross-cultural communication, 5) Identifying and controlling risk, 6) Positions versus interests, 7) Option building and the importance of listening, and 8) Hard bargaining.

    12. Special Lecture and Seminar: Yomiuri Shimbun Special Lecture - Comparative Asian corporate theory (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: MIZUSHIMA Tomonori)
    Journalists from the Tokyo Office of the Yomiuri Shimbun will conduct this course, based on their on-the-spot news coverage around the world and teaching experience in California. A series of topics related to Japan and other Asian countries will be included in this course.

    13. Studies in Jurisprudence: Law as political theory I, II (spring and autumn; 1 credit per semester; 1 class per fortnight; course co-ordinator: MORIGIWA Yasutomo)
    This bi-weekly two semester course introduces the student to the world of legal and political theory. Burning questions students have on political power and public order will be examined and explained. To facilitate the inquiry, theories of law and state by Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel and Marx, as well as their contemporary counterparts developed by Hart, Dworkin, Raz and Rawls may be discussed. The course will be taught in English, with summaries in Japanese as necessary. International and Japanese students are welcome. The day and time of class is subject to change upon discussion with the participants.


    School of Letters

    1. Asian Film History before 1945 (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: MA Ran)
    By figuratively dividing the film history in Asia into two stages, namely the pre- and post-World War II periods, we shall start our two-part survey on Asian film history with this particular course, in which the highlight is directed to early cinemas from East Asia. In positioning the survey of films within the socio-historical exigencies and cultural context of Japan, China and Korea before and during World War II, this course offers the students an opportunity to engage with the early cinemas and their evolvement from the perspective of social history and discourses of modernities in this region. Students are expected to acquire the basic knowledge on early cinemas in Asia, and learn to analyse films in relation to certain socio-cultural issues that became significant during the time frame under examination. This course comprises a combination of screenings, lectures, and discussions. Students must complete the reading assignments prior to each module.


    2. Aspects of Contemporary Japanese Culture
    (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: Kristina IWATA-WEICKGENANNT)
    Proficiency in both English and Japanese is needed for this class which will mostly be conducted in English, but heavily rely on untranslated Japanese source materials. Through a close examination of contemporary literature and popular culture, we will discuss the role entertainment media play in the discursive construction of Japan as an 'unequal society'. We are going to examine how Japan's presumed transformation from an all middle class society to a society of widening gaps is expressed through a variety of popular media including literature. Closely analysing examples of the past two decades, we will talk about how the decline of the salaryman culture, ice-age employment, and social disenfranchisement has triggered a paradigm shift towards a social discourse of precarity.


    3. Cinema and Cultural Theory (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: MA Ran)
    This course engages critical issues and debates on contemporary cultural theories by facilitating the inquiry with three broadly-divided but intricately interconnected themes, namely visual culture, popular culture as well as globalisation, all three of which offer various critical lens in examining global socio-cultural conditions and the discontents of modernity; such critical perspectives underpin the way how we perceive and critique the era we are living in. This course will engage students in sustained analysis and self-analysis of key ideas of cultural and social theories by referring to wide spectrums of cultural objects and practices, with particular interest in visuality and representation in cinematic works, while the survey also extends to painting, photography, video and the cyberspace. Students will assess the social construction and implications of certain cultural forms, phenomena and texts and evaluate the opposing takes and arguments. For case studies and certain reference readings emphasis will be given to popular culture in Asia.


    4. Japanese Culture: Language and communication I (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: YASUI Eiko)
    Language as a communicative tool has a close relationship with the culture in which it is used. This course on Japanese communication aims to provide students with an interdisciplinary overview of how Japanese language structure and culture form the ways Japanese people communicate. We not only discuss intercultural/interlanguage differences in communicative styles, but also observe the diversity within Japanese culture/language.


    5. Japanese Culture: Language and Communication  II (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: YASUI Eiko)
    The purpose of the autumn semester of this course is to look at various phenomena in conversation. We focus on how Japanese linguistic structures as well as society/culture form the way people talk. We also examine conversations in different contexts (casual conversations, business settings, service encounters, classroom interaction, doctor-patient interaction, native/non-native conversations, etc.) and discuss various communication problems in society.


    6. Modern Japanese Literature from an East Asian Perspective (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: Kristina IWATA-WEICKGENANNT)
    Proficiency in both English and Japanese is needed for this class which will mostly be conducted in English but heavily rely on untranslated Japanese source materials. The lecture is meant as an introductory course to the literature of ethnic Korean authors in Japan. We will approach this literature from a post-colonial perspective, placing particular attention to issues such as language and place/ displacement and trace their development across three literary generations. Besides literary texts, we will discuss a number of film adaptations.


    7. Post-war Japanese Cinema (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: FUJIKI Hideaki)
    This course provides students with an opportunity to learn both a basic history of post-war Japanese cinema as well as a general social history of post-war Japan. A particular emphasis is put on analysing films related to some of the socio-historical issues that became significant in the wake of World War II. The class comprises a combination of screenings, lectures, and discussions. (The following topics and films may be partly modified at the beginning of the semester.)


    8. Seminar: Cinema and Practice - City, Urban Culture and Cinema in Contemporary Asia (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: MA Ran)
    In this fast-changing, ever globalising world, the life and existence of human beings are to great extent defined by the urban condition they are enmeshed within and struggling with. This seminar attempts to survey major urban issues and cultural topics in modern societies by engaging with a wide spectrum of cultural texts drawn from films, literary works as well as architecture; in case studies, particular attention is paid to the social context and cities in Asia. City will not only be simply explored as the theme or ambience featured in these texts, following our adventure of "entering" the city, with the socio-historical dimensions of urban space theoretically surveyed, we shall direct our attention to the urbanites and their mental life. A critical journey of wandering in the city as flâneur and encountering other strangers would lead us into the "invisible city" as interwoven with fear, desire, memory, and dream. Finally, the seminar will position the study of urban culture within the heated discourses and debates on globalization. Departing from observations upon Asian metropolises, students are expected to debate and discuss cinematic texts in relation to the urban condition of local, regional and global scales. Through the seminar, students will learn to approach and critique the cultural space of cities by utilising key concepts drawn from various theoretical perspectives such as cultural studies, visual culture and sociology.


    9. Seminar: Theory and practice of Literary Translation (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: Kristina IWATA-WEICKGENANNT)
    Although concerned with translation, this class is not designed as part of a language learning programme and is therefore not primarily meant to improve your English/Japanese language skills; sufficient proficiency in both languages is a necessary condition for participating in the course. We are going to approach the problem of translation from an interdisciplinary perspective, reading a number of theoretical texts ranging from orthodox translation studies to anthropological concepts such as cultural translation. In order to become aware of the delicacy of translation, we will a) compare different translations from a same original text and b) translate texts back into their original language, discussing the translational choices made. Technical solutions to translation (e.g. online translation programs) will be discussed and tried out. In addition, students will do translations of their own and discuss what makes a translation "literary."

    Graduate School of Mathematics

    Perspectives in Mathematical Sciences I, II (autumn and spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: TBA)
    The courses are designed as English courses which the Graduate School of Mathematics provides for graduate and undergraduate students, not only from foreign countries, but also domestic students who strongly intend to study abroad or communicate with foreign scientists in English. All course activities, including lectures, homework assignments, questions and consultations are conducted in English. The purpose of this course is to introduce and explain various methods in mathematical science, and their applications. Each instructor will cover different topics of this wide-ranging field.

    School of Medicine

    1. Basic Research Laboratory Experience  (autumn and spring; co-ordinator: KASUYA Hideki)
    Students are affiliated to a basic research laboratory and learn about molecular basis techniques from a mentor researcher. Students are expected to become familiar with practices at a modern molecular laboratory in medicine.
    http://www.med.nagoya-u.ac.jp/english01/index.html

    2. Clinical Practice (Clerkships) (autumn and spring; co-ordinator: KASUYA Hideki)
    The School of Medicine offers clinical practice opportunities to students who are already engaged in such practice at their home institutions. For more detailed information, please access the website of the International Affairs Office, School of Medicine.
    http://www.med.nagoya-u.ac.jp/intlexch/english/abroad/overseas.html

    To apply to the clinical practice (clerkships), students should additionally attach "Application for Visiting Student Clerkship" to NUPACE Application Form.

    3. Public Health Research Laboratory Experience (autumn and spring; co-ordinator: KASUYA Hideki)
    Students are affiliated to a public health research laboratory and learn about data analysis of the human health environment from a mentor researcher. Students are expected to become familiar with practices at a public health laboratory in medicine.
    http://www.med.nagoya-u.ac.jp/english01/index.html



    School of Science

    1. Advanced Quantum Chemistry (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: Stephan IRLE)

    In complex reaction systems at high temperatures, following the minimum energy pathways on the potential energy surface is not only impossible, but will entirely neglect important entropic effects during the reactions. Quantum chemical molecular dynamics (QM/MD) simulations have recently elucidated the formation as well as erosion mechanisms of nanomaterials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphenes. In this class, all theoretical concepts important for QM/MD simulations will be covered.

    2. Computational Chemistry (autumn; 2 credits; I class per week; course co-ordinator: Stephan IRLE)
    "How can I use computers in chemistry?" The purpose of this course is to introduce computer science from a chemist's perspective. The course begins with an introduction to the basic use of computers for data search, and introduces FORTRAN 90 as a way to solve simple scientific problems in an efficient way.


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