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Introductory Courses Taught in Japanese

NB. The following classes are taught entirely in Japanese and participants are required to have attained at least level two of the Japanese Language Proficiency Test, or equivalent

Education Center for International Students

1. Global Society I (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: AKIYAMA Yutaka)

Shrinking space, shrinking time and disappearing borders are linking people’s lives more deeply, more intensely, and more immediately than ever before. Have time, space and borders collapsed into a global village? It depends on who you are. Globalisation, which is shaping a new era of interaction among nations, economies and people, has positive, innovative and dynamic aspects. However, it also has negative, disruptive and marginalising aspects. This class is designed to provide students with a general view of globalisation by focusing on transnational actors such as multinational corporations, NGOs, etc.

2. Global Society II (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: AKIYAMA Yutaka)

Globalisation has promoted open societies and open communities, and encouraged a free exchange of goods, ideas and knowledge. Awareness of rights and identities has been enhanced by improved means of communication. Yet there is growing concern about the current path of globalisation. Its advantages are few for many, whilst its risks are all too real. Its volatility threatens both rich and poor. Immense riches are being generated. Fundamental problems of poverty, exclusion and inequality persist. Corruption is widespread. The future of open markets is increasingly in question. We are at a critical juncture. This class is designed to have students deliberate the pros and cons of globalisation through public debate. 

3. Introduction to Japanese Society and Culture I (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: UKIBA Masachika)

This class will take up recent issues centring on the family and education system in Japan. The characteristics of Japanese culture and society will be discussed, whilst referring to specific cases in the students’ home countries.

4. Introduction to Japanese Society and Culture II (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: UKIBA Masachika)

To the Japanese, Korea, although resembling Japan, differs somewhere. This class will examine which aspects of Korean society and culture evoke feelings of both unease and empathy in the Japanese, and go on to deliberate a portrait of the Japanese, as reflected in the Korean ‘mirror’.

5. Introduction to Japanese Linguistics I (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: LEE Tack Ung)

This lecture attempts to provide a fundamental knowledge of Japanese grammar by taking up issues which seem to be problematic in Japanese linguistics and language education. Issues include parts of speech, usage, grammatical person, voice, as well as an introduction to Japanese language teaching methodology and course design. One particular issue is covered in each meeting, and class discussion is given strong emphasis. Therefore, participants’ positive participation is required.

6. Introduction to Japanese Linguistics II (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: LEE Tack Ung)

This lecture attempts to provide a fundamental knowledge of Japanese grammar by taking up issues which seem to be problematic in Japanese linguistics and language education. Issues include tense/aspect, modality, as well as teaching methodology related to the four skills (speaking, listening, reading, writing) and analysis of linguistic misuse. One particular topic will be covered in each meeting, and class discussion is given strong emphasis.

7. Introduction to Linguistics I (autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: MOMIYAMA Yosuke)

This lecture attempts to provide a basic knowledge of linguistics, including methodology, focusing on Japanese. The subjects of this course include some fundamental characteristics of human language, semantics (linguistic meaning), sociolinguistics, and linguistic typology. 

8. Introduction to Linguistics II (spring; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course co-ordinator: MOMIYAMA Yosuke)

We will analyse semantics, which constitutes one area of linguistics. After understanding the fundamentals of the subject, including its significance, approaches to the meaning of words and semantic analysis, we will, focusing on contemporary Japanese, study methods of analysis such as ‘synonymous expressions’, ‘polysemic expressions’, etc., with the objective of being able to conduct analysis by ourselves. Fundamental approaches to cognitive semantics will also be covered.

School of Letters

 Introduction to Japanese Language and Culture I & II (spring and autumn; 2 credits; 1 class per week; course-co-ordinator: SAITO Fumitoshi)

The goal of this course is to heighten students’ awareness and understanding of the Japanese language and culture. Lectures will focus on the Japanese writing system (kanji, hiragana, katakana, roma-ji) and Japanese words (Japanese native words, Sino-Japanese words, and loan words).

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